Sidney Crosby made history this past June after he became just the seventh player in NHL history to win the Conn Smythe Trophy multiple times.

 

#SidneyCrosby captures his second straight #ConnSmythe 🏆🏆

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Crosby’s case for the award was solidified after his Penguins defeated the Nashville Predators in six games to win the Stanley Cup.

 

 

Back to Back: The #Penguins score late to capture their second straight #StanleyCup

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Although most Conn Smythe winners have typically come from the victorious team, there have been exceptions throughout history. Dating back to 1966, here are five players who were named the postseason’s most valuable player after failing to win the Cup.

 

Roger Crozier- 1966

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Crozier was named the Conn Smythe winner in the trophy’s second year of existence. The former netminder’s Detroit Red Wings fell to the Montreal Canadiens four games to two.

 

Glenn Hall- 1968

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Hall won Stanley Cups with both the Red Wings and Chicago Blackhawks, but was unable to capture one after his strongest postseason outing. His St. Louis Blues ultimately fell to the Candiens in four straight games during the 1968 Stanley Cup Final.

 

Reggie Leach- 1976

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The 1975-76 campaign was one to remember for former Philadelphia Flyers forward Reggie Leach, who led the NHL in goals (61) and was eventually handed the Conn Smythe Trophy. The other important accomplishment missing from his season was winning the Stanley Cup, which was awarded to the Montreal Canadiens (surprise, surprise) after they defeated the Flyers in four straight games. Philadelphia had won the two previous championships in 1974 and 1975.

 

Ron Hextall- 1987

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The next losing Conn Smythe winner was not named until 11 years later, when another Flyer, goaltender Ron Hextall, was deemed the playoff’s MVP. Hextall captured the award as a rookie after posting a 15-11 record with two shutouts. Philadelphia’s loss came at the hands of the Wayne Gretzky-led Edmonton Oilers.

 

J.S. Giguere- 2003

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How could one forget Giguere’s infamous 2003 postseason?

The French Canadian was magical throughout the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim's playoff run, finishing with an impressive 15-6 record along with a ridiculous .945 save percentage and 1.62 goals against average. Giguere eventually got his ring after he led the Ducks to the franchise’s first Stanley Cup in 2007, but his stats during the latter run pale in comparison to the former’s.

It has increasingly become more difficult to capture a Conn Smythe award while playing for the Final’s losing team. Pikke Rinne, who was easily Nashville’s most valuable player throughout their stretch, did not receive a single first place vote.

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It might be a long time before we see a non-victorious player be named the playoff’s most valuable player.